CAPFAA consists of Financial Aid Administrators from Postsecondary Institutions, members of educational institutions, government agencies, and private and community organizations concerned with the support and administration of student financial aid. CAPFAA was established in 1969 to serve the interests and needs of students and their families through the financial aid process.  CAPFAA specifically assists in promoting and developing effective programs for student financial aid. Additionally, CAPFAA facilitates communication and cooperation among educational institutions and sponsors of student aid funds by organizing conferences and training sessions on important issues in student aid.

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"How can Louisiana resolve its $1.6 billion budget shortfall and drive more money into higher education? Well, one way is to ask students to pay more for college and graduate school," The Times-Picayune reports. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"College rankings measure prestige, success after graduation, and whatever else the group publishing them has decided matters in higher education. But a new study finds they're not great at measuring something that should matter a lot: how engaged students are in the classroom," Vox reports. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"Growing up in Miami in the 1990s, Carlos Escanilla was a lot more interested in hanging out with friends and playing music than in school," according to The New York Times' The Upshot. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"After years of government investigations, Corinthian Colleges Inc. will shut down more than two dozen of its remaining schools, displacing more than 10,000 California students," The Los Angeles Times reports. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"By now, most prospective college students have received their letters of acceptance and are weighing their financial aid packages. But what if the financial aid offer at your preferred school isn’t what you had hoped?" The New York Times asks. "'The time to appeal is if something has changed after the form was filed,' said Justin Draeger, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators." more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"If you don't pay your student loans, you could find yourself without a job. But, that law could change," WCIA reports. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"April is almost over. But one issue that grabbed headlines during National Financial Literacy Month is the recently released Department of Education (DOE) report on the tightened credit standards for the PLUS Loan," USBE Online reports. "Writing in a 2013 opinion piece for Inside Higher Ed, National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) president said although much more can be done to protect consumers from getting too deeply into debt, federal PLUS loans can be risky business for graduate students and parents of undergraduates who can use them to borrow up to the full cost of attendance at college." more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"As a former student loan borrower himself, President Obama has more than a passing familiarity with the complexities of higher education finance. But in a little-noticed bit of comment last year in an interview with David Karp, the founder of Tumblr, he issued some pointed criticism of the advice that students get on the way into college," according to The New York Times. A recent analysis conducted by TG and NASFAA "focused on the entrance counseling calculators, which tell new students to enter the amount they plan to borrow, the interest rates and what they think they’ll earn once they graduate. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"My dad grew up in a country that was generous and farsighted enough to see that the more its people learned, the more its people earned," Martin O’Malley, former Democratic governor of Maryland, writes in an opinion piece for The Washington Post. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015
"How many different flavors of jam do you need to be happy? In 2000, a famous experiment showed that when people were presented with a supermarket sampler of 24 exotic fruit flavors, they were more attracted to the display. But, when the sample included only six flavors, they were 10 times more likely to actually buy," according to NPR's Ed. more >>
Mon, Apr 27, 2015

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